Courses in English

Courses in English

ENG 0099: Basic Skills (3)
Offered for credit/no credit. Designed for students who need remediation in speaking and writing standard English, this course integrates work in grammar, organization, spelling, and vocabulary enrichment with specific spoken and written assignments ranging from sentence construction to paragraph development and the creation of essays of substantial length. Emphasis is on mechanical correctness and rhetorical development. Classroom work is supplemented and individual problems addressed by laboratory assignment using computer software.

1000-level courses

ENG 1010-1020: Composition (6)
Prerequisite: passing grade on the proficiency examination or successful completion of specified portions of Speech and Writing Laboratory; ENG 1010 is prerequisite to ENG 1020.
Expository writing, ranging from single paragraph to essays of some length and complexity; study of the logical, rhetorical, and linguistic structures of expository prose; the methods and conventions of preparing research papers; and argumentation. Full-time students who have not completed ENG 1010-1020 or the equivalent must enroll in the appropriate course in that sequence.

ENG 1030: Honors Composition (3)
Prerequisite: Advanced Placement
After a rapid survey of the modes of expository writing, this course emphasizes analytical and argumentative composition with topics drawn from selected major works of American and English literature, as well as world literature in translation. In a seminar setting, all assignments will emphasize discussion, research and writing of high quality.

Note: All courses 2000 and above presume completion of ENG 1010 and 1020 or ENG 1030; credit for upper-level courses in English will not be given unless the student has successfully completed ENG 1010 and 1020 or ENG 1030.

2000-level courses

ENG 2050: Vocabulary I (2)
Prerequisites: Sophomore status
This course builds vocabulary and reading skills with roots and stems of the English language, practice exercises, and readings that reinforce and promote word-building skills, especially for those who plan on post-graduate work.

ENG 2120/3120: Topics in World Literature (3)
Prerequisites: ENG 1010-1020
A study of works of foreign literature in translation. Examples include The German Novel, German Short Fiction, The Russian Novel, The Contemporary Novel, and The Double in Literature. Students seeking upper-level credit for this course will complete compositions or readings in addition to the assignments for ENG 2120.

ENG 2130/3130: Topics in American Literature (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or 1030
A study of selected themes in American literature. Students seeking upper-level credit for this course will complete compositions or readings in addition to the assignments for ENG 2130.

ENG 2140/3140: Topics in British Literature (3)
A study of selected themes in British literature. Students seeking upper-level credit for this course will complete compositions or readings in addition to the assignments for ENG 2140.

3000-level courses

ENG 3000: Introduction to Literature (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or 1030
A survey of the various forms of literature with emphasis on a close reading of the text. Particular attention is given to the expression of student ideas in both written and oral forms.

ENG 3010: Appalachian Prose and Poetry (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or 1030
A survey of the prose, poetry and drama of the Appalachian region. The study includes research in collection of local materials.

ENG 3020: Greek and Roman Drama in Translation (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or 1030
A study of plays of major Greek and Roman dramatists with an interdisciplinary trans-cultural approach.

ENG 3030: African-American Poetry and Prose (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or 1030
A survey of the prose, poetry and drama of African-American literature including works from the 19th and 20th centuries.

ENG 3040: Literature of the Fantastic (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or 1030
A selection of fantastic literature within the western tradition from the pre-Christian to the modern era.

ENG 3050: The Western Literary Tradition 1 (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or 1030
A survey of western literature from the Hebrews and Greeks through the Renaissance

ENG 3060: The Western Literary Tradition 2 (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or 1030
A survey of western literature from the Neo-classical period to modernism

ENG 3070: Arthurian Literature (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or 1030
The origins of the legend of King Arthur in British and Continental writing and the development of Arthur in literature from the Middle Ages to the present century. Major topics for consideration will include: the origins of the legend; Arthur and the Grail myth; Arthur in epic and romance; the Lancelot and Guinevere story; Arthurian revivals in the Renaissance, 19th, and 20th centuries; and the quest for the “historical” Arthur.

ENG 3090: Asian American Literature (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or 1030
This course is designed to introduce students to the major works of Asian American writers, including the Eaton sisters, Carlos Bulosan, Maxine Hong Kingston, Amy Tan, Hisaye Yamamoto. Bharati Mukherjee, John Okada, Li-Young Lee, and David Hwang.  The course will pay particular attention to Asian Amercian diasporic culture and identity crises in Asian American communities.  Issues for discussion: immigrant legacy, Asian Amercian relations to the values and mores of the homeland or Confucian cultures, Asian American stereotypes, the “model minority” myth, family and community, and images of Asian American masculinity and femininity.  We will also examine how Asian American writers over generations of assimilation, cultural, racial, and generational conflict have conveyed unique ethnic experiences that have enriched, and even changed, our understanding of modern American life.

ENG 3100: Readings in Literature (1-2)
The reading of a list of works agreed upon by the student and the department.

ENG 3110: Women in Literature (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or 1030
A study of representations of women will focus on transnational and multicultural literature by both male and female writers, with particular attention to the relationship between the traditional roles of women, female stereotypes, and the dilemmas women and women writers have encountered in search of their own identities and places.  By juxtaposing male ideas of women with women’s struggles as individual selves, students will examine how a traditionally male-centered and masculinist culture and literature could be re-envisioned.

ENG 3120: Topics in World Literature (3)
See ENG 2120/3120

ENG 3130: Topics in American Literature (3)
See ENG 2130/3130

ENG 3140: Topics in British Literature (3)
See ENG 2140/3140

ENG 3150: The Mystery Novel
Designed to satisfy the general education requirement in English literature, this course will explore major works in the mystery tradition: works covered will include classic mystery writers, such as Arthur Conan Doyle and Agatha Christie, as well as works by modern practitioners of this popular but important genre. Students will get a background in the history of this type of novel as well as practice performing literary analysis.

ENG 3160: The Knight in Literature and Culture (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or ENG 1030
The course focuses on the figure of the knight, its historical development, and its role in current culture, including in the development of the American concept of citizenship. Although the United States Constitution expressly forbids its citizens from holding knighthood or royal titles, the figure of the medieval knight and the values he represents hold strong sway over the national imagination and affect our attitudes toward honor, social conduct, and behavior in the face of danger. Through examination of selected works of poetry, prose, and non-fiction, this course examines the role of knighthood and European “chivalry” in contemporary society.

ENG 3170: Literature of Diasporas (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or ENG 1030
Literature of diasporas explores concerns arising from forced or voluntary migration in tangential to the issues of citizenship, along with writers born into hybridity and cosmopolitanism in an increasingly globalized world. However, in spite of many factors leading to willing or unwilling diaspora, many people are still bound by the traditional nation-state notions of pure language and pure identity, instead of coming to grips with multiple, fragmented, contradictory identities in the twenty-first century.

ENG 3180: Scottish Literature (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or ENG 1030
This course surveys great works of Scottish literature, focusing on fiction and poetry after the Jacobite uprising of 1745 through the end of the twentieth century. These readings will be supplemented by lectures on relevant historical, cultural, and religious contexts, as well as occasional film viewings. Recurring topics of interest include representations of Scotland’s unique customs and traditions; its conflicted relationship with England as well as its place within Great Britain; the divisions within the nation itself (rich versus poor, Highland versus Lowland, religious versus secular); the nation’s transition from a rural to an industrial and urban society; and the concept of a Scottish “split psyche.” In the process of studying these elements of Scottish literature, history, and culture, students will also develop close reading, critical thinking, and argumentative writing skills that they can apply across the curriculum and in their lives beyond college.

ENG 3210: Advanced Composition (3)
The study of effective exposition and argumentation, with some attention to the principles of rhetoric and their application in written compositions.

ENG 3270: Survey of British Literature I (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or 1030
Emphasis on major figures such as the Beowulf poet, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton. Attention is given to the heroic ideal, romance, tragedy, lyric and satire. This emphasis is combined with a close reading of texts and the writing of a series of essays, some of which reflect the student’s ability to do research.

ENG 3280: Survey of British Literature II (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or 1030
Emphasis on major figures such as Austen, Wordsworth, Keats, Tennyson or Browning, Shaw, Eliot, and Lawrence or Joyce. Attention is given to the democratization of the heroic ideal, the failure of the vision (the anti-hero), and the development of modernism. This emphasis is combined with a close reading of texts and the writing of a series of essays, some of which reflect the student’s ability to do research

ENG 3330: Creative Writing I (3)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
The writing of essays, poems, and short stories.

ENG 3340: Creative Writing II (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or ENG 1030
Continued practice composing various literary forms.

ENG 3410:An Introduction to English linguistics (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or 1030
Elementary phonology, morphology, and syntax, with some discussion of the English vocabulary. Recommended for students certifying to teach.

ENG 3420:History of the English Language (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or 1030
The development of English from its beginning to the present. This course is recommended for students planning to attend graduate school in English.

ENG 3430: Teaching Writing (3)
Prerequisite: Upper division status
Provides an overview of current writing theory and practices in multicultural, public educational settings. Course themes include: culture (including issues in ESL and nonstandard dialects), literacy, writing pedagogy (process, expressive, narrative, collaborative, student-sponsored), conferencing, assessment, and technology. Students will develop demonstrations of teaching practices, as well as a portfolio that will include teaching philosophy, a dialogic learning log, a strategy for assessment, and a fi nal paper addressing one of the class themes. Students will work with Appalachian Writing Project teacher consultants, who will model cutting-edge practices in teaching writing K-12. This course is cross-referenced because it is appropriate both to students who plan to become K-12 teachers, and English students who plan to attend graduate school and may be teaching composition. This course requires 20 hours field experience/observation in a 6-12 school setting. Dual listing with EDU 3590.

ENG 3450: An Introduction to Literary Theory (3)
Prerequisite: Any 3000-level English course
A study of critical theory combined with analysis of selected works.

ENG 3690: 16th Century British Literature
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or 1030
The sixteenth century comprises a crucial period in English political, cultural, and religious history. This period saw the emergence of England as a world power, the formation of a distinct brand of English Protestantism, and the transmission and flowering of continental humanism. The literary productions of the period both reflect and helped shape these complex developments. This course will focus on major English—and a few continental writers—including More, Erasmus, Sidney, Spenser, and Shakespeare. The first third of the course examines on the early modern court and the range of literary responses that it engendered. The middle third explores literary responses to the English Reformation. The final month is devoted to the study of particular poetic theories and forms (with particular emphasis on the sonnet sequence). We will read and discuss these sixteenth-century texts with two main goals in mind: a) to introduce students to the historical, philosophical, and aesthetic currents shaping literary production in this period; and b) to help them develop critical methods of reading, thinking, and writing about literature.

ENG 3700: 17th Century British Literature (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or 1030
A survey of British literature from Donne through Milton.

ENG 3710: 18th Century British Literature (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or ENG 1030
A survey of British literature from Dryden through Johnson. The course will sample representative eighteenth-century writers (such as Swift, Pope, Behn, Defoe, Addison, and Montagu) and literary genres (including plays, novels, pamphlets, the periodical essay, and satire). It will also introduce students to the social, political, religious, and intellectual currents shaping literary production in the period.

ENG 3730: The Early British Novel (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or 1030
A survey of the British novel from its beginnings to Dickens.

ENG 3810: Survey of American Poetry and Prose I (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or 1030
A survey of American literature from the colonial period to the last quarter of the 19th century, with emphasis on Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman and Dickinson.

ENG 3820: Survey of American Poetry and Prose II (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or 1030
This course surveys a significant range of works and introduces the rise of various American literatures from the post-bellum period—when American literature came of age—to the post-modern era. We will begin the class by foregrounding the tension in American literature between the enormous yearning to forge a new literary and cultural identity and the need to come to terms with a European past. We will then explore how the developing idea of our national literature through its multi-cultural heritage provides an interpretive framework for our readings and how it gives rise to modern narrative and poetic forms. We will pay particular attention to the inter-relation of literature and culture, examining how issues of the formation of the modern American self relate to literary trends, the American Dream, language and reality, politics and war, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and especially race. Students will consult both primary and secondary sources and will formulate their responses both in class discussion and in writing.

ENG 3830 : Southern Literature (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or 1030
This course is designed to offer students a survey of the literature of the American South from the colonial period through the late twentieth century. The main focus will be to provide a general picture of Southern Literature – some of its major themes and writers, as well as its construction as a scholarly fi eld of study. The class will read primarily short stories and novels, but also some poetry, drama, and critical essays, and will examine literature as a refl ection of southern culture during that period, attempting to reconstruct the historical and social context(s) in which these works were produced. This course will also examine issues of gender, class, race, and region, as well as aesthetic and thematic techniques.

ENG 3870, 3880: Cooperative Education Project I (1-6, 1-6)
Students can obtain information from the Department Chair.

4000-level courses

ENGL 4000: Chaucer (3)
A study of the major works of Chaucer, with special attention to the Canterbury Tales.

ENG 4010: Studies in Medieval Literature (3)
Prerequisite: Any 3000-level English course
A study of representative works of medieval literature, including works from the Anglo-Saxon period (seventh through eleventh centuries) through the fifteenth century. Alternating topics may include: The Medieval Romance Tradition; Medieval Allegorical Literature; Medieval Dream Visions; Medieval Drama; Medieval Courtly Literature; The Medieval Lyric and Ballad; Age of Chaucer; Chaucer and the Fifteenth Century; and others.

ENG 4030: Modern and Contemporary Poetry (3)
Prerequisite: Any 3000-level English course
A survey of the major British and American poets of the twentieth century, which may include British poets from Yeats to Auden and American poets from Williams to Bishop, with emphasis on the aesthetic innovations, poetic imagination and visual art, and literary relations in modern and contemporary culture.

ENG 4040: Modern and Contemporary Fiction (3)
Prerequisite: Any 3000-level English course
A study of the major British and American fiction writers of the twentieth century, with occasional inclusion of some non-western and European writers. Primary texts may include works by Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, Forster, Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Morrison or DeLillo, with emphasis on narrative innovations.

ENG 4050: Shakespeare: The Early Plays (3)
Prerequisite: Any 3000-level English course
A study of representative plays from Shakespeare’s earlier works.

ENG 4060: Shakespeare: The Late Plays (3)
Prerequisite: Any 3000-level English course
A study of representative plays from Shakespeare’s later works starting with Hamlet.

ENG 4070: The 19th Century American Novel (3)
Prerequisite: Any 3000-level English course
This course is designed to offer students a survey of the rise of the American novel from its beginnings into the period of American realism. We will begin with the sentimental tradition, examining the controversies surrounding novels and the alleged dangers associated with reading novels, particularly for women readers, and why virtually no novels were published in colonial America before the Revolution. We will examine the ways in which novels were used as didactic conduct books, the moral/social pressures imposed on authors, and the ways in which early American authors were beginning to define and question issues of national, personal, social, racial, gender, etc. identity. As we progress into the nineteenth century, we will look at authors who were beginning to be able to make a living as writers, and some of the major novelists of the American Renaissance, as well as some very popular, but until relatively recently, under-acknowledged authors. We will then examine the abrupt shift from the romantic tradition toward realism and some of the major works within that tradition, as well as naturalism. The main focus will be to provide a general picture of the growth of the American novel from the early national period through literary realism.

ENG 4080: British Romanticism (3)
Prerequisite: Any 3000-level English course
This course explores British literature of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, from roughly 1789 until 1832. Primary texts may include work by Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Scott, Austen, Percy Shelley, Mary Shelley, Keats, and De Quincey. The course will consider such major issues and concerns as: the powers of the imagination; theories of poetry and the poet; the French Revolution; social and political reform; national identity; war and empire; the slave trade; constructions of gender; and responses to the natural world. In the process, it will introduce students to the social, political, and intellectual contexts of the Romantic period.

ENG 4090: The Victorians (3)
Prerequisite: Any 3000-level English course
Covering the Victorian Period (1832-1901), this course will include both poetry and prose. It will likely include poets such as Robert Browning; Alfred, Lord Tennyson; Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Matthew Arnold, DG and Christina Rossetti, Algernon Swinburne, and Gerard Hopkins. Fiction writers could include: Elizabeth Gaskell, Charles Dickens, the Bronte sisters, George Eliot, Thomas Hardy, and Oscar Wilde.

ENG 4740: Studies in Literature (3)
Offered on demand.
A study of special topics in world literature.

ENG 4870, 4880: Cooperative Education Project II (1-6, 1-6)
Students can obtain information from the Department Chair.

ENG 4940: Internship (2-3)
Supervised experiences for students, usually in the area of their primary interests. An outline of the internship is developed by the student prior to enrollment and a paper is subsequently developed to analyze and evaluate the work experience. The area in which the internship is taken will be designated on the student’s transcript. (The internship cannot be used to meet departmental requirements except as a substitute for ENG 3870, 3880, 4870, or 4880.)

ENG 4950: Studies in American Literature (3)
Offered on demand.
A study of special topics in American literature.

ENG 4960: Studies in British Literature (3)
Offered on demand.
A study of special topics in British literature.

ENG 4970: Independent Study (1-3)

ENG 4980: Senior Thesis I (1)
Prerequisite: Senior status and 18 hours of English classes above 3000, or permission of Department Chair.
Discussions leading to the writing of a paper using critical analysis.

ENG 4990: Senior Thesis II (2)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 4910
Discussions leading to the writing of a paper using critical analysis